Infrared Photography, Part 1 – Photography with Imre – Episode 23

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Episode 23 of my photography series discusses and demonstrates infrared photography; this is part 1 of 2. You’ll also want to check out my blog – binarygraphite.blogspot.com – as it’s supplemented with additional information and links to sites describing this topic in detail. Hope you enjoy, remember to “Like”, and subscribe so you can stay up to date with my future videos. Follow Me on Twitter: twitter.com

Comments

jonceballos says:

i guess i should specify that it was a very cloudy day. and I could adjust my iso as well to get a better result

jonceballos says:

i made the mistake of buying an IR850 filter. It requires nearly 3 minutes exposure for a good result.

binarygraphite says:

Thank you! :)

Shammon Noman says:

Weldone. made it simple but to the point.

toocoolforu says:

Thanks for the reply, yeah it may be due to the IR filter. I’ll soon remove the filter and see the difference!

binarygraphite says:

I use an Olympus LS-10; quite happy with it.

binarygraphite says:

… to manipulate the image.

binarygraphite says:

Personally I too like the colored ones a bit better. The color issue might have to do with a few different aspects but there are two ideas I have based on what I know. The first has to do with the IR blocking filter on the sensor and filter combination which likely isn’t allowing a large enough spectrum of light through (from what I’ve seen, IR modified cameras have better false color reproduction). The second might have to do with more extensive photo editing work; simply more time put in…

toocoolforu says:

I don’t think it makes any effect to the final picture, i used to care at first too, now i don’t lol.

toocoolforu says:

In my opinion, colored infrared pictures look way better.
They give that surreel, dreamy effect. It works well with Hoya R72 filters.
I’ve made some colored IR pics myself, but when editing in photoshop i’ve never really had a purple foliage like most people do… I assume it’s from the camera bc i’ve tried longer exposure and *you name it* settings. I guess it has to do with the 12bit raw format (unlike 14bit on Canon or nikons DSLR) maybe ? I use a Lumix 4/3rd GF1, someone knows ?

sallywags1 says:

Very helpfull, I saw a white dancing mist on super night shot(no filter yet) and wonder if anyone can tell me what it was? it was pitch dark in my bedroom.Could it have been a fly? im new to this so any input much app. Thanks.

Antonio Rodriguez says:

Which handheld recorder do you use? Tascam? great sound !

amazinggadgets says:

Hoya filters are incredibally hard to clean…. just spent 3 hours cleaning my hoya nd400x and there are still smudges on it…. I would rather for for b+w if they sell these.

binarygraphite says:

Of course everyone is entitled to their opinion(s). However, there is more than just shooting IR images in this video and those with limited experience with cameras and IR photography (e.g. just starting out) and with patience will appreciate the whole package. Thanks for your comment.

Qzyxya says:

get to the point… way too long.
The whole 8 minutes summarized: prefocus, screw on the filter, and guess the exposure. very simple

blankplanet says:

take a TV remote control point to the camera (without filters), press any button and take a picture. if its overexposed your camera is sensitive to ir, if its dim, not so much and if you cant see anything, no luck with infrared fotos. on my 500d the light is dim im guessing yours will be too as the models are very similar

binarygraphite says:

Can you be more specific with the camera settings you were using, as well as which filter? I’ve had some people comment about certain Canon cameras not being very sensitive to near IR light, so you might need a longer exposure… but that’s only a guess with what little info I have. Please let me know.

jtwong87 says:

hI, i’m using Canon 550d and tamron 18-200mm and IR filter…i got a black unedited photo after my shoot…do you know what happen ?

binarygraphite says:

Thank you and I hope you get some great results!

juan manuel Gomez says:

very useful, I have one IR filter from Opteka and I´m going to use it as you explain in your video….:) 

binarygraphite says:

Sorry for the really late reply! Thanks for your comment and yes I have an episode on ND filters, number 11; I can’t link to it in the comments, but you can find it on my channel page.

Tim Nunyer Bizniz says:

Thanks for your time and effort in making this tutorial and have you made an indepth for using ND filters? once again thank you 🙂

binarygraphite says:

Thanks! :)

publiux says:

Great stuff!!

C067142677 says:

hehe the bee thing was funny. very good video by the way. thank you

binarygraphite says:

Thank you for the comment, glad you found it useful!

Khorask says:

Great tute.. very informative

ScotPhotography says:

I can see the queen mary

binarygraphite says:

Glad to help! My email is binarygraphite at gmail dot com

binarygraphite says:

It almost sounds like you’re describing an image that has high contrast; tough to tell like this. I always shoot manual when doing IR work. If you want, feel free to send me an email with a photo you took and I can give you some quick feedback that way. You might just need to punch up the shadow areas using PS or other image editor.

binarygraphite says:

It’s still possible to take pictures when it’s not that bright out but you’ll either need to increase your exposure time into the minutes or increase the sensitivity (or both). Also, consider opening the lens as wide as you can to allow as much light in as possible.

binarygraphite says:

That should be the thread size. Have fun with the new IR filter when you get it!

binarygraphite says:

This filter comes in a variety of sizes so it probably does. But check your lens to be sure what size it is (should be on the front); I’m seeing 52mm according to Nikon’s website.

binarygraphite says:

Wonderful to hear! Best of luck!

WG02451 says:

Great explanation! I just bought an IR filter and am still trying to play around with it to get the settings correct. This helps a lot!

binarygraphite says:

Happy to hear you found it useful! 🙂

RANGER724 says:

glad i found this, just starting out, perfect explanation to ir photography, thank you for posting!!

binarygraphite says:

Depending on the lens it can be a little tricky. This is especially true with some zoom lenses that move with little friction and lenses that rotate the front element to focus (versus the internal variety). But with a little practice over time this shouldn’t be much of an issue.

Diogo Santos says:

Just one last thing, we focus first, but then putting the filter its pretty hard to put it without moving the focus.. $:

binarygraphite says:

The one thing that comes to mind if you’re not getting a great result with your camera and you require very long exposure times is that the IR blocking filter on your sensor is very strong. Therefore, the sensor just isn’t picking up much IR light to develop a good enough exposure. If possible, you could try the filter on another camera or try a different filter altogether to see what result that provides.

Diogo Santos says:

I have a 950nm to and with F/4, 30 sec exposer, and 3200 iso Still doesnt look that perfect.. And if it did thats a pretty long exposer and pretty High Iso.. $:
Please repply.

Mypsychedelicart says:

The best Ir tutorial ever! Thanks, mate!

moviemyles100 says:

press 4 and he says poo
press 6 and he has a spasm

binarygraphite says:

Depending on how sensitive one’s retina is, along with the frequency of the remote’s beam, I wouldn’t be too surprised; one day I’ll give that a try.

binarygraphite says:

Biologically our eyes are not sensitive to IR light, more specifically the rods and cones on the retina do not respond to light beyond the visible spectrum; humans are capable of seeing wavelengths of light between about 400-750nm. On the other hand, even with an IR blocking filter in place on most digital cameras, the sensors can pickup some near IR frequencies of light, like that of the remote control.

123kgpsai says:

Mr.Imre, what is the reason that our eye can not see that infrared light that is coming out of remote control but a camera can?

Thank you

bigjohnhaw says:

@binarygraphite, Thanks, I will check your blog.

binarygraphite says:

I’d also recommend a visit to my blog as you can read the supplemental post there (there’s an episode guide link off the main page). If you don’t like the red tone you get on the cam after taking an IR photo, you could set the WB to compensate for it and I’ve written a little about it there. I hope this helps, good luck.

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