HDR Processing Techniques with Rob Hanson – Part 2 of 5

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HDR Processing Techniques with Rob Hanson – Part 2 of 5, includes Layering Tonemaps in Photoshop CS5, Image Cleanup. Originally posted on my blog site at robhanson.wordpress.com

Comments

iamalikhan says:

So this HDR was an HDR of various other HDRs! Nice Video. I am new to Photoshop but found some innovative ways to use Photoshop. Thanks for your time, Rob!

RobHansonPhotography says:

I use a Mac, so the keys for Mac are Option-Shift-Command-E. On a Windows PC, use (Control + Shift + Alt + E) This will merge a copy of all visible layers into a target layer.

Perhaps you’re difficulty is in not first pointing to the top layer in the stack. I’m not sure if it makes a difference, as Help says, “Merge ALL visible layers into target layer,” but it helps to keep things straight if you target to the top layer. Beside that, I can’t say, because the keys work fine for me.

adalanama says:

hi rob,nice video..but i have the same problem like senthild76…are you mean ‘the pc’ is the microsoft windows system?…

RobHansonPhotography says:

moatazoh — The files were provided by my friend, Mark “Konaflyer” Patton. They are not available for use. Sorry.

moatazoh says:

Can I know from where I can find the photos that you used at the tutorial?

hh78212 says:

Klufvgffgdy

RobHansonPhotography says:

I should add that I have this key combination mapped to my Wacom Intuos tablet. Highly recommended.

RobHansonPhotography says:

On a Mac, it’s Option-Shift-Command-E. The PC mapping should be similar, and can be found in the Photoshop Help file.

This command takes all visible layers below and merges them all together into one layer. While I structure projects differently now, this merge technique is a simple way to do a “checkpoint” on your work. As you proceed, you can always roll back to one of your merged layers and try something different.

senthild76 says:

Hi Rob,
What command did you used to merge layer. where you are able to get layer 4 with all other layer details on it. because when i do the merge layer it merging into one layer. could you please advise

lerno86 says:

ya,its optimum..owh..thanks sir..really nice tutorial!!!!

RobHansonPhotography says:

lerno86 – I often make three different tonemaps in Photomatix, in case they’re needed: 1 ‘vivid’, 1 ‘shadowmap’, and 1 ‘optimum’, which is the tonemap where the settings seem to be best. These are layered in Photoshop in various ways, but not all of them are always used. I believe that one was left unused in this video… was it the ‘optimum?’ Probably.

Often, I won’t know where post-processing will take me, so it’s nice to have several versions handy.

lerno86 says:

errr,what was the function of optimum picture?sorry newbie here.

gottalovepie says:

12:06 more precisely 

gottalovepie says:

12:08 “Oh, that’s a bird.”

RobHansonPhotography says:

Thanks for checking in kevlazer. It’s been my hope that people who watch these videos will pick up at least one great new tip. Glad you did!

RobHansonPhotography says:

If you’ve never taken a photo, how on Earth did you wind up watching these videos on YouTube? Boy, if I wasn’t a photographer, I’d bore myself to death with these videos. :))

Thanks for watching. Perhaps HDR will kick-start you into a great new hobby or profession, as it did for me. If so, good luck!

RobHansonPhotography says:

What?

kevlazer says:

WOW amazing tutorial. I’m a 3d designer and use mapping all the time, you used the shadow map and I never thought of using that in photography, thank you for this and I have not even got to the end of your tutorial. Love it!!

RobHansonPhotography says:

Brutale — I did use a bit of HDR Express output, if I recall correctly, in order to improve one area of the image. HDR Express/Expose is part of my normal workflow, but I didn’t rely on it very much for this image because my friend Konaflyer uses Photomatix… I wanted to keep the workflow based mostly on Photomatix.

brutale says:

Rob, thanks for sharing such valuable techniques with the community.
Your tutorial is by far the best HDR processing tutorial around the web.
Did you use HDR Express/Expose at any stage of your processing? Or am I misled by some of the comments here?
I haven’t noticed you mentioning HDR Express/Expose on the 5 parts video, but maybe it’s just my bad english.

RobHansonPhotography says:

@jjualvare In most cases, I use HDR Express. Difference: HDR Expose can be a standalone program. Expose merges brackets to an HDR file, then allows substantial adjustment to the image before saving. HDR Express merges, but only allows a few adjustments, so a file merged in HDR Express needs further adjustment in Photoshop. 32 Float is a Photoshop plugin that provides the adjustments that Expose has.

One either uses HDR Expose standalone, or Express & 32 Float if Photoshop is involved.

jjualvare says:

Are you using HDR Express or HDR Expose, what’s the differnce?

Alex Baker says:

Man thats amazing. I have never take a photo in my life, or used photoshop but I want to start. Looks like I have a lot to learn! Thanks for the videos, they are very informative.

RobHansonPhotography says:

Sprezz – Thanks for checking in.

I’m not sure what you mean by that. The images going into Photomatix were RAW files — straight from the camera — and the outputs were manipulated in Photoshop. That IS post-processing. Everything was included in this tutorial, from in-camera to the final save.

If you mean “How were the shots taken?”, then that’s a different story. I don’t recall the exposure values Mark used, but I’m sure the scene was shot on a tripod using AEBracketing.

I hope this helps.

Sprezzaturaluralay says:

The only difficulty that I have with this (amazing) tut is that it does not specify just how the start photograph (which, as he says, is not the author’s work) was post-processed – it seems that a lot of the qualities of the final version depend on just how the original was made – of which we have no clue…?

gottalovepie says:

Oh…that’s a bird.

RobHansonPhotography says:

Yes, the two programs produce completely different outputs. Any product by Unified Color creates a more realistic, true-color image than Photomatix. On this video series, I concentrated on Photomatix because that’s what Konaflyer usually uses. If I were publishing this image for myself, I likely would have used HDR Express/32 Float much more prominently.

Each program has its strengths and weaknesses. Using layers, you can easily incorporate the best bits from each.

/Rob

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