Learn Wedding Photography: Posed Pictures in a Church

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More info at: www.fstoppers.com This is a short excerpt from the 14 hour long wedding tutorial: How To Become A Professional Commercial Wedding Photographer. In this excerpt Lee Morris shows how he uses a single Profoto D1 to light family posed pictures in 3 different churches. For more info on the full tutorial visit www.fstoppers.com

Comments

Andy Lu says:

I think the reason for being able to bounce light off wood using two pro-foto strobes is that they’re over powering the color off the wood. just like shooting through a flash gel; the higher the power used to shoot through a flash gel, the less the color will be transmitted to the subject……. I think it’s the same idea while bouncing off a colored wall/ceiling……

Rusty Bryant says:

Flashlights? David Ziser might be able to get away with using some type of LED flashlight when he shoots, but I’d never bring one to a wedding unless I was going to use it to find the lens cap that I just dropped behind something. I’d like to see some of those shots too…

iglyduckling says:

Nice photos, Very useful video like usual, thanks for sharing!

neirad537 says:

I’ve bounce light with a 250 in a high ceiling church with no problem. You may need to increase the ISO a bit but it will work with little to no noise whatsoever.

FStoppers says:

If you bought Hurley’s, shoot us an email. You must have missed the preorder 🙂

FStoppers says:

The goal is to create consistent looking images quickly. You can get as creative as you want for sure. Just keep in mind, usually family’s want very straight forward posed photos so you can identify everyone. IMO getting creative for these shots isn’t necessary. We prefer getting more creative with the wedding party or Bride and Groom when we aren’t as rushed.

mrsourcream says:

The pics all looked very bland and very much a like. Not overly creative or different.

Borislav Zhuykov says:

i cant post links but mostly they’re much darker and no way to bounce the flash into the ceiling

pursueadventure says:

Any talk of a bundle deal Peter Hurley + wedding?

Patrick Hall says:

Chapter 6 on reception lighting. You can use the same setups for the posed photos if you had to. Do you already have the full tutorial?

Ana Maria Mendez says:

and where is that?

Ana Maria Mendez says:

Muchas gracias

FStoppers says:

Sometimes, that’s why you test the WB in camera right then and there. Sometimes it works, sometimes you can’t bounce and have to resort to something else

FStoppers says:

How is that? We have shot and lit churches in Scottland and Germany.  What do eastern churches look like?

FStoppers says:

Yeah you really can’t do this effectively. For one, in most cases your base exposure still has some ambient light contributing to the image. If you gelled your flash you would have to kill all the ambient otherwise you’d have a crazy two tone color cast. Also, it’s very very tough if not impossible to “reverse” the bounce flash color with gels. Your best option is to directly light the group from far away as close on axis as possible to avoid shadows on people in the group

underweightHater says:

if you have an orange-ish wall, is it possible to gel the light green (or whatever the opposite color is) and thereby get white light?

im aware it could only work for the direct bounce and the indirect bounces would still pick up orange. but does anyone do that? or do you lose too much light? does it come out muddy looking?

Borislav Zhuykov says:

Both churches were with perfect lighting conditions… i wonder how would you lit church like those in Eastern Europe..

35mmraw says:

Interesting about bouncing off wood and adjusting with white balance, but wouldn’t it leave a funny colour cast?

lpcustom123 says:

Flashlights? Even if I knew nothing about photography and a guy came in to light with flashlights shooting at ISO 1000 without having proper equipment it would be hard for me to take that person seriously. The technology is available to do this right and I’m pretty sure that I could set that up, test in 5 minutes and ensure proper coverage of the entire altar. I’m not pimping this DVD by any means but if you have the means to afford a D1, remote, etc then this is how you should be doing it IMO.

Patrick Hall says:

my demonstration is more at the reception. We give you 4 different ways to light a reception. It’s pretty thorough and should cover 98% of the situations you are faced with at a wedding reception.

Dimitry49 says:

alright so this is lee’s little demonstration from the DVD, what about Patrick’s? Would like to see a portion of that as well…BTW, really great job on that Peter Hurley DVD, and I’m 100% competent this one will be just as insightful. Appreciate all your contribution towards the YouTube community where we beginners can learn from the pros. :D:D

Patrick Hall says:

You would have to light the people directly. We give a lot of lighting options for these situations in another section of this tutorial.

FStoppers says:

Flashlights? You have to share some examples of that! Why do you not have time to setup a single studio light? A monoblock takes literally 60 seconds to put on a stand and pop into a ceiling.

Atanjeo1 says:

Really cool! BUT, I don’t have time to set up such a lightning, even with assistant.
Take Tripod, shoot RAW, use a modern Cam (D4). Then I shoot till 1000 ISO, 1/50 -1/100 Shutter, f4–5,6 depending. A little lightening faces & bodies in LR and I have nearly the same quality with the benefit of a more natural look.
Sometimes I use flashlights. I put 2-3 not in front, but behind the group to highlight the background. It gives the group a shiny, holy touch and color & contrast to the church.

italianreviewer says:

Wow! That church is actually very bright!

musaka14 says:

wow the final pictures with the light bounced on wood turned out better than I expected. But if the church is all in wood, and there is no white surface to bounce light, and bouncing of the wood is not possible either, what would you do in this case?

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